Central City Concern

Providing comprehensive solutions to ending homelessness
and achieving self-sufficiency.

September Volunteer Spotlight: Recovery Month Edition

Sep 30, 2016

September Volunteer Spotlight: Recovery Month Edition

September is National Recovery Month, a time to celebrate recovery and share stories about how substance use treatment and mental health services have helped people live healthy and rewarding lives.

This month we were honored to connect with an Employment Access Center (EAC) Clothing Closet volunteer who also identifies as being in recovery. Read how recovery has impacted Dikeeshea’s attitude towards volunteerism, her interactions with others, and her career aspirations.

Name: Dikeeshea Witherspoon

Position: I volunteer in the clothing closet at the Employment Access Center.

Could you tell me a little about your duties in the clothing closet?

My duties in the clothing closet are going through any clothing that people donate to Central City Concern, [deciding] what I think should be put in the clothing closet and then organizing by size and style. I also help when people come in and need an outfit put together for an interview; they’re looking for a certain size of pants, or a shirt, or if they just need some clothes. It’s fun because me being the age that I am (millennial) I can kind of hit towards the hipper stuff to wear.

What first drew you to Central City Concern?

I was working but I wanted to give back to the community that I took from. Using drugs, stealing, like all of the crazy stuff that comes along with using drugs and drinking and being homeless, I wanted to give back. So I started volunteering at the St. Francis Church in Eugene after two people in recovery told me about it. Boy, was it an experience! To be able to feed the community no matter what walks of life they went through; I was eager to be a part of something like that. I wanted to stay volunteering and after I came to Portland, I wanted to keep being a part of a group. That’s what really pushed me into Central City Concern.

Since coming here do you feel like you’ve become a part of the bigger group?

Oh yes! Especially since I got a nametag and my picture is on it and it says “volunteer” on the bottom. I feel like I’m part of the community just because I am a volunteer. I can walk into the EAC and feel absolutely comfortable. Yeah, it’s homey. I’m there and it’s good for me.

How would you say your recovery has informed your volunteerism and vice versa?

I go to NA meetings and I have a service position, but for me that’s not enough. Being able to volunteer for a community that is the same as what I’m going through or what I’ve been through---like the community of being homeless, the community of looking for a job and trying to survive outside---I feel like it’s helped my recovery tremendously. If I didn’t volunteer, I’m not sure my recovery would’ve blossomed as much as it has. It holds me accountable. Like, if I don’t volunteer am I giving back? I’m not.

I started outdoing drugs and drinking and not thinking about who I was hurting, about the people I was hurting outside of myself. You know, like my family, like all the crimes I committed while being under the influence, not worrying about taxpayers money, not worrying about anything. I just didn’t care. But now that I’m clean and sober I see all of the people that I hurt, how much I hurt myself, how just, disgusting I felt inside. And how pure, and clean, and open that I feel now I’m clean and sober and I’ve been able to help with volunteering and even working. It’s very full circle.

Have you had any experiences in the clothing closet that have stuck with you or just made your day?

So one day there was this gentleman who was really early on in his recovery. He came into the clothing closet and he didn’t have any teeth in and he was really embarrassed. He was talking like his mouth was almost closed and he had his hand over his mouth and I was thinking “oh my gosh, why is he doing that,” you know? And then he said, “Oh, I’m sorry I’m talking muffled, I just don’t have my teeth in. I haven’t got them yet.” And so for somebody to come in and try to find clothes because he has a job interview and he doesn’t even have his teeth yet, that touched my heart. He’s still looking for work and he’s going to go into this interview teeth in or not! I don’t know if I didn’t have teeth in, or if I couldn’t take a shower, or if I couldn’t do my hair or put on makeup, I don’t know if I would have gone to the clothing closet and attempted to get some clothes for an interview or even had an interview.

And I actually saw him just yesterday and he was grinning from ear to ear. He’s been working, and he was just smiling, and I thought “oh my god, that is the same guy that I saw months ago but with all of his teeth now.” They were just bright and shiny. And, every time I see him I think about that because I see him in the community and yeah, it touched me. It gave me hope in people.

Any thoughts or parting words you’d like share?

I would say that Central City Concern has really helped me. It opened up my eyes to see the community of where I came from to the community of where I want to be. It’s opened my eyes to get back into school. This will be the first time, my going to college. It’s helped me to bring it all together to know what I want to do with my life. Being able to talk to people about their job or how they got there and me wanting what they have. I didn’t used to think that way but seeing how many people have walked the same life that I’ve walked and now look at them; so successful. That’s my parting words.

 

 

 



Special Announcement - Sept 23, 2016

Sep 22, 2016

Visit our announcement page for more details regarding today's news.



CCC on NPR: TANF 20th Anniversary

Sep 09, 2016

We want to share a National Public Radio story (August 22, 2016) recognizing the 20th anniversary of TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), which highlights Central City Concern’s (CCC) opportunities for people experiencing homelessness. Amber’s story of treatment for her addiction disorder and bringing her family back together is inspiring. Oregon is lucky compared to other states who haven’t supported the TANF program as well.

Of course, we were thrilled to get national recognition for CCC and Oregon’s strong programming to help families. The strength of Oregon’s support to needy families is, in part, due to the good work of the Oregon TANF Alliance*, a consortium of agencies. This alliance works with the Oregon legislature and the Oregon Department of Human Services to ensure the TANF program reaches every eligible family for the federally allowable time-limit of 5 years, protecting thousands of children from the most extreme form of family poverty: zero income. Without this cash benefit, as well the childcare expenses and the supportive case management services covered by TANF, thousands of families would be living on Portland’s streets.        


We were greatly relieved—for our own clients as well as for families across the state—that TANF funding was maintained and improved during the 2016 legislative session. It remains crucial to provide families with a firm pathway out of poverty and toward a more stable income—and TANF plays a major role in that support. Every day, CCC supports TANF families through treatment, housing and employment services. And we will continue to fight for TANF families both here in Oregon and at the federal level. Today, an Oregon family has to earn at or below a paltry 37 percent of the federal poverty level to qualify for TANF cash assistance; that’s down from 59 percent when the program began in 1996. For a deeper understanding of TANF in Oregon over the past 20 years, we suggest a review of this recent blog post from the Oregon Center for Public Policy .

CCC collaborates with many others to fight poverty and end homelessness; it makes us stronger and more effective. We’re grateful for the opportunity to partner with the Oregon TANF Alliance to help families in Oregon stay together and safe.

 

 



Central City Bed®

Central City Bed® - unfriendly to bed bugs, stackable, easy to clean and reuse. Appearing at national trade shows. Check Central City Bed for details. Learn more »

Special Announcement

September 23rd
Visit our page for details about today's special announcement!  Learn more »

Central City Coffee

Through craft roasting coffee in Portland, OR, Central City Coffee supports the clients and mission of Central City Concern. Available at local retailers and as office coffee! Learn more »